April 8, 2014

Lucio Fontana

Study, 1939

April 3, 2014
SP Arte 2014

image

I currently have some work at SP Arte with Gallery Nosco in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

sp-arte/2014
April 03 – 06, 2014

Pavilhão Ciccillo Matarazzo
[Biennial Pavilion]
Parque Ibirapuera, Portão 3
São Paulo, Brazil

Hours
Wednesday 2, 11am and 2pm to 10pm for guests only
Thursday 3 to Saturday 5, 1pm to 9pm
Sunday 6, 11am to 7pm

"The São Paulo International Art Fair was founded in 2005, it is now the most distinguished art fair in Latin America presenting the top galleries from Brazil and across the globe.  Over the span of five days, SP-Arte offers a unique opportunity to interact with artworks, artists, curators, and other professionals from the art world."

March 27, 2014
Clint Roenisch - New Gallery Space


“After ten years on Queen Street Clint Roenisch is moving to a new, larger space that will open in early summer. The details will follow. Thank you to all the artists, curators, collectors, writers and friends of the gallery for this first decade of exhibitions. We look forward to welcoming you to the next.”
 

Clint and the gallery are moving to an awesome new space, super excited for him and really looking forward to showing here. Good shit.

12:48pm
  
Filed under: clint roenisch 
March 20, 2014
Today I mailed a banana to Bill deKooning.

Today I mailed a banana to Bill deKooning.

(Source: rayjohnsonestate, via michaelswaney)

March 18, 2014

CLIKATAT IKATOWI

March 15, 2014
Asphalt Watches

March 14, 2014

Some new zen’d out eye burner drawings

March 14, 2014
We need you back to the @nyknicks Dr. Phil Jackson! #knickstape #nyknicks #philjackson #grotesknyc

We need you back to the @nyknicks Dr. Phil Jackson! #knickstape #nyknicks #philjackson #grotesknyc

(Source: grotesknyc)

March 14, 2014
grupaok:

On Chris Kraus and Where Art Belongs: a fascinating, forceful account by Elizabeth Gumport in n+1. Given our current work, we attended closely to Kraus’s broadsides against the MFA degree and its effects on the Los Angeles art world. To wit,

The MFA is a “two-year hazing process” “essential to the development of value in the by-nature elusive parameters of neoconceptual art. Without it, who would know which cibachrome photos of urban signage, which videotapes of socks tossing around a dryer, which neominimalist monochrome paintings are negligible, and which are destined to be art?”
Duly initiated in sock videos, artists graduate to a handful of galleries, where their advanced degrees reassure collectors intending to get their money’s worth. The MFA is a quality assurance stamp, certifying that no matter what a piece looks like on the surface, it is guaranteed to be full of art-historical references. Alternative exhibition spaces are “dead-end ghettos, where no one, least of all ambitious students, from the art world goes.” While curators and professors consider the continuum between MFAs and galleries a “plus”—“what makes LA so great,” chirps one gallery owner, “is that the school program is actually a vital part of the community”—Kraus had her doubts. What “community” were these people talking about? “It is bizarre,” she observed, “that here, in America’s second largest city, contemporary art should have come to be so isolated and estranged from the experience of the city as a whole.”

And then:

Like Los Angeles’s galleries, the art inside constituted a closed circle of vacuous self-reference. “Preemptive emptiness” prevailed: “the greatest triumph of this art work is … the way it references so much, content dancing on the surface like a million heated molecules”—angels on the head of a pin and pixels on a screen—“until you can’t pin it down to any given meaning. As such, it is an embodiment of corporate practice: never put into writing what can be mumbled on the phone.”

And then:

"The professionalization of art production—congruent with specialization in other postcapitalist industries—has meant that the only art that will ever reach the market is now art that is produced by graduates of art schools.” This is the crux of Kraus’s true dissatisfaction with the contemporary art world: as the lives of artists started to look ever more alike—high school, college, MFA—they decreased in value. “The artist’s own biography doesn’t matter much at all. What life? The blanker the better. The life experience of the artist, if channeled into the artwork, can only impede art’s neocorporate, neoconceptual purpose. It is the biography of the institution that we want to read.”

Whether or not we agree, or agree fully, or might wish to emphasize different terms or possibilities, such writing as this clears the mind, and one’s positions, in an entirely helpful way.

grupaok:

On Chris Kraus and Where Art Belongs: a fascinating, forceful account by Elizabeth Gumport in n+1. Given our current work, we attended closely to Kraus’s broadsides against the MFA degree and its effects on the Los Angeles art world. To wit,

The MFA is a “two-year hazing process” “essential to the development of value in the by-nature elusive parameters of neoconceptual art. Without it, who would know which cibachrome photos of urban signage, which videotapes of socks tossing around a dryer, which neominimalist monochrome paintings are negligible, and which are destined to be art?”

Duly initiated in sock videos, artists graduate to a handful of galleries, where their advanced degrees reassure collectors intending to get their money’s worth. The MFA is a quality assurance stamp, certifying that no matter what a piece looks like on the surface, it is guaranteed to be full of art-historical references. Alternative exhibition spaces are “dead-end ghettos, where no one, least of all ambitious students, from the art world goes.” While curators and professors consider the continuum between MFAs and galleries a “plus”—“what makes LA so great,” chirps one gallery owner, “is that the school program is actually a vital part of the community”—Kraus had her doubts. What “community” were these people talking about? “It is bizarre,” she observed, “that here, in America’s second largest city, contemporary art should have come to be so isolated and estranged from the experience of the city as a whole.”

And then:

Like Los Angeles’s galleries, the art inside constituted a closed circle of vacuous self-reference. “Preemptive emptiness” prevailed: “the greatest triumph of this art work is … the way it references so much, content dancing on the surface like a million heated molecules”—angels on the head of a pin and pixels on a screen—“until you can’t pin it down to any given meaning. As such, it is an embodiment of corporate practice: never put into writing what can be mumbled on the phone.”

And then:

"The professionalization of art production—congruent with specialization in other postcapitalist industries—has meant that the only art that will ever reach the market is now art that is produced by graduates of art schools.” This is the crux of Kraus’s true dissatisfaction with the contemporary art world: as the lives of artists started to look ever more alike—high school, college, MFA—they decreased in value. “The artist’s own biography doesn’t matter much at all. What life? The blanker the better. The life experience of the artist, if channeled into the artwork, can only impede art’s neocorporate, neoconceptual purpose. It is the biography of the institution that we want to read.”

Whether or not we agree, or agree fully, or might wish to emphasize different terms or possibilities, such writing as this clears the mind, and one’s positions, in an entirely helpful way.

(via jessiethatcher)

March 12, 2014

(Source: thegreatwormspirit, via luminousinsect)

March 7, 2014
Anonyme, George Grosz portant le masque de la mort (George Grosz wearing a death mask), 1919-1920, photographie

Anonyme, George Grosz portant le masque de la mort (George Grosz wearing a death mask), 1919-1920, photographie

(Source: archives-dada, via pennyarcadevintage)

March 6, 2014
Spring/Break

Quick snapshot of my work at Spring/Break - “You Are Not Here”, curated by David Flinn in NYC this week.

March 5, 2014

(Source: elevatorteeth, via vvincit)

February 24, 2014
Pierre Bonnard in his studio, Paris 1946

Pierre Bonnard in his studio, Paris 1946

(Source: mimbeau, via artspotting)

February 24, 2014

I’m in this group exhibit opening next week in NY, organized by David Alexander Flinn, should be a good one.

It’s part of the Spring/Break Art Show.

March 4, 2014 | Preview Day

Press Preview 2pm - 4pm

Collector’s Preview 4pm - 6pm

VIP Vernissage 6pm - 9pm

Collector and VIP Preview’s by Invitation Only or VIP Card

March 6 - 9, Noon - 8pm | Daily Hours

Old School, 233 Mott Street, NYC

VIP Card or $5.00 at the door

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